Open Studio Event

“I don’t usually like contemporary art but I just love the Rex Rays!”

“I just wanted to thank you very much for your hospitality during the Open Studio event this past Monday. It was lovely to see you at work and to hear your take on market conditions and the role of interior designers in driving trends etc and it was equally fascinating to see a range of your stock. I hope to be able to start searching for my perfect rug in the near future and will certainly ask you to conduct the search for me as I was very impressed by everything I saw yesterday.”

“I was delighted with the Shiraz Rug (SL 660) for £750 which I managed to carry home safely. It looks great in colour and size on the wooden floor in my loft/library.”

“Thank you for your email. I am really really happy with your work on the 2 rugs. I love the look of them now.”

“Rachel, thank you very much for today you made us both feel very welcome just a shame the weather was not kinder to us. The rug is absolutely gorgeous thank you very much for all your hard work and time you put in to it”.

 

An extract from the article in The Observer Sunday April 2, 2006

The colour

While artificial dyes are no reason not to set foot on a carpet, they can never match the earthy evocation of their natural alternatives: among them cochineal red, from the crushed, dried insects, blue from the indigo plant, henna orange, hollyhock purple, pomegranate yellow and gallnut black. How to tell the difference? Rachel Bassill, a London carpet dealer who runs The Rug Studio, says natural dyes ‘should be as bright and rich in colour as a bunch of flowers. There shouldn’t be any one colour fighting for attention.’ Avoid ‘hot’ colours, she advises, such as ‘a red that’s as hot as a tomato. If it’s the red of a tulip, then that’s a vegetable dye colour.’ Oranges and hot pinks will definitely be chemical dyes, she says. The dyes also differ in the way they penetrate the fibre. Bend the carpet so as to expose individual threads from the base to the tip. Synthetic dyes will colour them evenly whereas natural ones tend to show variance.

How to haggle

‘You’re insulting me!’ The carpet dealer’s ubiquitous refrain but one that still bamboozles many Westerners into a bad buy. You should view haggling with clinical detachment: the dealer’s affrontedness is not what it seems but simply a tried technique of exploiting your embarrassment to his advantage. Rachel Bassill offers some of the best advice. ‘Turn the tables,’ she says. ‘Tell them, “No. You’re insulting me!”‘ You will be one step closer to a relatively painless purchase of that object you desire.

“I am writing to say how pleased we are with the runner you recently delivered. It looks lovely in the hall – as if it has been there for years “

Restoration

“Just a note to thank you very much for making such a beautiful job of our stair carpet. You have transformed it and greatly improved the appearance of the staircase. Your young helper Kieran also did a most professional job in laying the carpet. Thank you again”

Lecture Feedback

“On behalf of the Middle Essex Guild of Spinners, Weavers and Dyers, I would like to thank you for a really interesting talk last Saturday. After coming in at short notice, battling with the Essex traffic and road signs and then fighting the projector ‘gremlins’, you gave a thoroughly enjoyable talk that we could have listened to for another 2 hours”